How To Tell If You’re Truly Hiring A Team Player

hiring a team player

How can you tell if you’re really hiring a team player? The interview process alone can’t possibly reveal that — so it requires delving a little bit deeper to find employees who pull their own weight and more.

We asked leaders from all over to answer this question: “How do you know you are truly hiring a team player?” Before your next hire, take a look at some real insight and wisdom from various business leaders.

Hiring A Team Player

Going The Extra Mile

Deniz Sasal, Founder of The Career Mastery, says trust is paramount.

“Just as everything else in life, trust plays an integral role in choosing a candidate,” he says. “This is a critical element that many employers somehow tend to forget.”

Sasal continues:

“A new addition to a team should not only have the desired skills and experiences, but also should be someone of integrity, someone who will proudly represent an organization in his/her social and professional circle, someone who will go extra mile because he/she believes in the organization and fights for its future success. Now, that’s what I call a true team player and that’s why I believe trust and integrity should play a key role in choosing candidates. You can always bring a new hire up to speed with training, yet it’s not easy to instill integrity in someone.”

Another crucial point he noted: “A candidate who tries to deceive the interviewer in a job interview will continue to do so once hired.”

Offering Hands-On Collaboration Opportunities

Jonathan D. Roger, Operations Director & Certified ScrumMaster at AndPlus, suggests adding a hands-on activity to the interview process.

“We’re a software firm. A key part of our interview process is having the candidate come in and build a simple application with a couple of our senior engineers in the space of 30-45 minutes,” he says. “This often makes it easy to tell whether or not a candidate plays well with others. Some candidates grow frustrated when offered suggestions, which often leads to a no-hire decision. Candidates who are receptive to criticism and treat our engineers like resources and teammates rather than annoyances always seem to be our best team players.”

Volunteering, Mentoring & Facing Failure

Founder & CEO of Source Capital Funding, Inc., Sacha Ferrandi, offered unique insight on hiring and identifying team players.

“There are many traditional ways to identify team players,” he says. “However, we have found that there are other several more non-traditional traits to look for that indicate a great, team-focused candidate.”

Ferrandi provided three key traits to seek out when hiring a team player:

1. Volunteer Experience.

Look for volunteer experience that goes deeper than donating or one-time community events. The key here is to find candidates that volunteer their time and actually go out and make an impact with the organization they volunteer at. This shows a dedication to their community and indicates that they like to help build and hold together a team.

2. Handling Failure.

One great way to gauge a candidate’s team-oriented traits? Talk about a time of failure. Look for someone that is comfortable taking the blame and not pushing it off on others. Especially as businesses win or lose as a group, having a member who has the mentality of: “Well, I did my part. It was someone else’s fault.” — does nothing to grow a team’s long-term cohesiveness.

Putting blame on others, even if others are responsible, is a warning sign of a bad team player. No one likes working with someone who throws people under the bus. Having someone like this on your team could be detrimental to your group’s success.

3. Mentoring

Does your employee or potential candidate mentor others? This trait is an exceptional quality to have in a team environment because it demonstrates that the person wants to help others succeed. This is especially true for roles that require specific knowledge. Those willing to share their expertise and help grow others’ careers fit extremely well in any organization.

hiring a team player

Watch For Warning Signs & Seek Out Certain Traits

Bret Bonnet of Quality Logo Products points out: You never know for sure what you’re getting beforehand, but in my experience, employees who are true team players:

a.) Are more productive.

b.) Stick around longer.

c.) Cause fewer problems.

“We’re slowly but surely replacing those who don’t want to play ball (and get upset when their favorite type of sugar packets go missing from the snack room) with those who care more about the company’s goals,” Bonnet adds.

He continues: “It all starts with the interview questions. When interviewing candidates we do our best to avoid any off-the-shelf questions that the employee might have had a chance to prepare for. The goal is to make them uncomfortable or catch them off guard. Then, we hear real, honest answers instead of rehearsed answers.”

At his organization, Bonnet says, they pose questions such as:

Saturday is your boyfriend’s/girlfriend’s birthday. Saturday is also the night of the big company party. Do you attend the company party or celebrate the birthday? Why?

On the surface, it doesn’t seem anything too complicated. But if they can’t give a good reason for missing the company party, their answer to this question often weighs heavily against their chance of getting hired. People who are unable to celebrate it on a different night/day than a mutually agreed upon day where 100% of your co-workers will be in attendance does not belong at your company.

Finally, check for other telltale signs of employees who are not team players. This includes: Those who ALWAYS keep their office door closed, and those who ALWAYS wear headphones. Candidates with extroverted personalities also ultimately have a higher likelihood of being a team player.

Dig Deep

David Waring, Co-Founder of Fit Small Business, says the interview process gives employers the chance to dig deep and figure out if they’re hiring a team player.

“For an experienced candidate, the type of jobs they had prior can give you great insight as to whether or not they are a team player,” he says. “For example, salespeople who work on commission are used to an environment where they need to worry about their own sales and productivity. They are generally out for themselves rather than working as a team. So if you are looking to hire a team player, proceed with caution.”

Waring added that projects, interactions and even extracurricular activities can shed light on your hire.

“For other types of positions, simply asking the candidate what types of projects and interactions they have had with their team can give you good insight. However, you need to consider this on a granular level rather than a high-level view of things.”

Finally, the questions they ask at the end of the interview can give you great insight. If they’re asking about culture and interacting with people, then that is a positive sign. If they ask about compensation and growth in position, while it’s not a bad thing, it doesn’t give any insight into whether they will be a good team player or not.

It May Not Be Completely Innate

Deborah Sweeney, CEO of MyCorporation, says her goal is to hire team players.

“We screen for ‘team player-ness’ by asking questions about their work ethic, examples of how they contribute to their prior companies and willingness to go above and beyond,” she says. “Sometimes we can identify people who we believe could be team players with a little nurturing and then we pair them with other already-established team players in our company.”

Sweeney continued: “I don’t think being a team player is innate. It needs to be learned at times. It also often comes from management. A team player mentality can be contagious; when leadership in a company are team players, then the team tends to rise to the occasion. So, if someone has the right attitude, you can further evolve their ‘team player’ status by setting expectations, setting a good example with leadership and rewarding behavior that shows a can-do attitude.”

What other advice do you have for hiring a team player? Let us know — and contact the professionals at Y Scouts when hiring a team player.


Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that finds purpose-aligned and performance-proven leaders to help organizations achieve their missions faster. Ready to supercharge your leadership search and get the right person in your organization? Contact Y Scouts.

Best 6 Product Manager Interview Questions

product manager interview questions

Are you looking to hire a project manager to propel your company forward and make revenue goals come to fruition? Take a look at the top product manager interview questions to pose during your next hiring cycle.

Best Product Manager Interview Questions

Tell me about recent product launches in your last role and how you determined their success or failure.

A good product manager understands the problem he or she is trying to solve before solving it. This means that the candidate will have clear, data-driven metrics for success and failure pinpointed before the work begins. As such, the interviewee should be able to clearly tell you if the launch was a success or a failure.

Walk me through the steps of how you would design “X Product.”

A great candidate would follow up with clarifying questions for this one. This is one of the top product manager interview questions, as it reveals a specific example of a product—and how the interviewee would execute the idea from start to finish.

If you were given two products to build from scratch, but you only had the time & resources to construct one, how would you decide which one to build?

Product strategy means saying “no” sometimes. Product managers should prioritize by selecting the project that will likely generate 80% of the impact and forecast what that impact is. Also, he or she should factor in the SWAG cost in resources, money and other scarce resources before deciding to build.

This system forces a product manager to really think through themes, create a plan, allocate resources, eliminate the need to prioritize different projects against each other, and forecast impact. That’s what makes this one of the top product manager interview questions.

Tell me about your current role on your team, or previous role. Who else did you work with, and how did you work with them?

Excellent product managers will discuss working with analysts and engineers. Listen for indications that the candidate follows a continuing regular and flexible feedback loop with everyone involved.

Share some insight on how you would improve our own product.

This is one of the best product manager questions to ask, because it opens the floor for the candidate to be honest about your product. What works? What doesn’t? How could it be improved? Dig deep on this one; it also reveals if the interviewee has done his or her research.

How would you explain product management to a stranger?

An excellent candidate for the position of product manager would know the ins and outs of the role. Watch out for a candidate who hesitates or speaks in cliches and offers an unclear picture of product management.

Do you have any more product manager interview questions to add to this list? Let us know!


Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that finds purpose-aligned and performance-proven leaders to help organizations achieve their missions faster. Ready to supercharge your leadership search and get the right person in your organization? Contact Y Scouts.

Top 7 Business Development Interview Questions

business development interview questions

If you’re looking to add a business development manager to your company, the first step is to ace the interview. Asking the right business development interview questions ensures you’re choosing the right candidate for the role.

Take a look at some of the most important topics to cover when interviewing a business development manager candidate.

Top Business Development Interview Questions

How has your background prepared you for sales?

One of the best business development interview questions uncovers the candidate’s prior experience in the field. What past roles have led him or her to your company? Furthermore, what specific skills have led the candidate here?

How do you feel about working to targets? Can you share your annual quotas in your most recent job?

A truly talented, driven business development manager would be enthusiastic about working to targets. After all, that is what the role encompasses.

Have you ever lost an opportunity to do business with an important partner? Why? What did you learn from the experience?

A candidate’s failures are just as important to discuss as his or her successes. Thus, when it comes to the best business development interview questions to ask, this is a must.

Pick something in this room and then sell it to me.

Test the candidate’s most basic selling techniques. Seek out a focus on differentiation as well as value. If the interviewee hesitates or can’t present valid selling points for a random item in the room, it’ll reveal traits you may not want in a business development manager.

What does your ideal customer look like?

Ask the candidate to share the kind of customer he or she would love to serve, because this will uncover the interviewee’s priorities for how they seek out clients. It will also show you the way in which the candidate wants customers to react to proposals.

How do you sell unpopular ideas to people? Also, what keeps you motivated in your work?

A great business development candidate would focus on the positive aspects of any idea, and then explain why it will benefit someone. Ideas might be unpopular, but their outcomes are often welcomed once people understand more clearly what is being proposed. Hitting targets and achieving goals should be a business development manager’s primary motivation. Is he or she motivated by wanting to do an excellent job and improve business?

How would you keep in touch with existing customers?

Prospective customers may be a shining twinkle in the eye of a business development manager—but so should current and returning customers. One of the best business development interview questions points the focus at the customers.

Do you have any more business development interview questions to add to this list? Let us know!


Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that finds purpose-aligned and performance-proven leaders to help organizations achieve their missions faster. Ready to supercharge your leadership search and get the right person in your organization? Contact Y Scouts.

Top 8 Social Media Manager Interview Questions

social media manager interview questions

Social Media Manager Interview Questions

Looking to hire a new Social Media Manager, but not sure where to start with getting to know the candidates during the interview? Well, start here—because we have some social media manager interview questions that are sure to get the answers you’re looking for (or not looking for).

Top Social Media Manager Interview Questions

What online communities have you managed in the past?

This question can help you separate the social media manager from the social media user. If the candidate is able to tell you about pages he or she worked on beyond creating a profile and simply posting content to it, then that’s a good sign. You want someone who will tell you they built a relationship with the community through engagement.

How do you stay in tune with the latest updates, innovations and platforms on social media?

Social media never stops changing. It seems like every day there’s a new update. Thus, it’s important for even the absolute best social media guru to stay on top of new trends. If you want to hire someone who will create success in this position, make sure he or she has ways of finding out about and learning the new trends pretty quickly.

Which social media platforms do you recommend for our company and why?

This question is one of the top social media manager interview questions because you can take it farther and request more details. Candidates should always research the company before they head in for an interview, so by asking this question, you can see if they know your online brand. If they know your brand, they should be able to go through each platform and say exactly what you should do for each. And if a candidate can do that, you’ll get to see how well they know their social media.

What would be your first goals for our company?

Social media goals should always go beyond something as simple as getting more likes or followers. You’ll want to hear details from the interviewee. How will the candidate actually acquire those likes and followers? If he or she can walk you through how to grow engagement through various methods, then you’re on the right track toward hiring a great social media manager.

How do you deal with negative comments or a brand reputation crisis?

Social media managers might see many negative comments and reviews, so how a candidate deals with them is obviously important. Furthermore, how he or she defines a crisis could say a lot about the interviewee’s experience. If a social media manager’s idea of a crisis is someone blasting the company in a Facebook post, then chances are he or she hasn’t seen too much action in that area. However, it’s not just about how much this candidate has dealt with in the past. You also want to hear how they would approach any new issues while at your company. What steps would he or she take to calm the situation and control it?

What customer service experience do they have?

This goes along with the last question, in a way. It’s not all sunshine and rainbows on social media. Sometimes, you’re going to have angry people come at you—so it’s important to have some customer service experience. A candidate who is familiar with customer service will prove that he or she knows how to express empathy and compassion. Plus, it shows the candidate can deal with an upset customer in a professional way.

What is your biggest social media failure?

Failure happens. It is how you accept it as well as what you learn from it that’s important. Maybe your candidate does not have any huge failures, but he or she certainly has made some mistakes. Maybe the interviewee posted the wrong information or forgot to post an important announcement—all “fixable” issues. If he or she can still admit to doing those things and describe how to keep from making that mistake in the future, that’s what you really want out of this question.

Tell me a story.

This one’s a bit different—and a bit fun. Social media is all about telling a story about your company, so you’ll want someone who can tell a compelling story. See what your interviewee comes up with. If the candidate can tell it well and make it interesting, then they have the basic skills required to do excel in social media management with your company.

Do you have any more Social Media Manager interview questions to add to this list? Let us know!


Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that finds purpose-aligned and performance-proven leaders to help organizations achieve their missions faster. Ready to supercharge your leadership search and get the right person in your organization? Contact Y Scouts.

Detecting Deception & Lies In The Recruitment Process

lies in the recruitment process

Recruiting can be tough. But it’s even tougher when you detect a red flag during your interactions with a candidate. This comprehensive guide will help you determine if a candidate you’re attempting to recruit might be fooling you.

Detecting Lies In The Recruitment Process

Zeroing In On Any Non-Specifics

As a general rule of thumb—and it may not directly point to lies in the recruitment process—but if a candidate does not provide very specific stories with details, you should remain skeptical. Does he or she talk in general platitudes or clichés? Is the candidate unable to recall specific stories or examples around their generalities? If the answers to both of those questions is “yes,” the candidate might simply be saying what he or she thinks the interviewer wants to hear, rather than truly backing it up with a memorable story.

Think about it. If someone were to ask you about some of your toughest moments, the things you are most proud of, your biggest learning lessons, you’d have some concrete examples. It may take you a second to remember, but if a candidate fails to recall specific examples or stories, it should make any recruiter nervous. This is not to say the candidate is definitely lying. However, it certainly raises a red flag.

Burned Bridges?

Furthermore, when a candidate is incredibly slow in delivering a list of references, it could be a cause for concern. This means he or she is unwilling to put you in touch with former supervisors or subordinates. “I don’t want you to talk to my boss, and I sure don’t want you to talk to people I’ve managed in the past.” Those are usually signs that the candidate might not prove as great of a fit as you might believe.

Body Language & Verbal Contradictions

Other forms of lies in the recruitment process might include nonverbal cues and contradictions when recounting stories. Contrary to popular belief, avoiding eye contact and fidgeting are not surefire signs of deception on the candidate’s part. However, you might take note of a candidate touching their face, crossing their arms or leaning away. Of course, many mannerisms stem from the pressure of an interview setting, but in recruitment, it’s smart to always be wary of these potential signs.

Another way to detect deception and lies in the recruitment process? Watch out for a candidate who delivers contradictions in his or her stories. This could clue you in on a candidate who’s describing things that may not have happened at all, or happened in a way other than the candidate describes.

Don’t be fooled during your next recruitment process! Do you have more questions regarding detecting deception and lies in the recruitment process, or do you need assistance finding the right people for your organization? Let us know!


Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that finds purpose-aligned and performance-proven leaders to help organizations achieve their missions faster. Ready to supercharge your leadership search and get the right person in your organization? Contact Y Scouts.

Why Work At Y Scouts?

why work at y scouts

Why work at Y Scouts? Take a look at some perks of working with our small but growing team in Scottsdale, Arizona. From our purpose-based mission to our camaraderie in the office, here’s why working at Y Scouts is a wonderful thing.

Why Work At Y Scouts?

Working With A Purpose-Driven Organization

It all starts with our purpose at Y Scouts and why we exist as an organization. You will love working at Y Scouts if the idea of transforming how people and companies are connecting to work that really matters is something that would matter to you. That’s at the most fundamental level. If the idea of changing the way people and companies are connecting in the employment space fails to excite you, then it doesn’t matter what we offer you—what job, salary, stock, bonus, etc. It starts with that firm foundation.

The “Hiring Laboratory” Of Y Scouts

The second thing is, do you enjoy being a part of a nimble, small, startup-minded entrepreneurial organization that’s constantly testing, experimenting and trying new things? Some people need structure. They need resources. They need clarity. We might say that we’re none of that. We know what our purpose is and what our mission is, but beyond that, we’re in a constant laboratory. Y Scouts is a hiring lab of sorts. And we’re constantly figuring out how to continue to do what we’re doing better.

Thus, some of the top benefits of working at Y Scouts include: the opportunity to create impact, to see the fruits of your work immediately, to have your voice heard from day one, to contribute right away, and to feel like you’re part of a family—a team.

Our Five Values

At Y Scouts, our mission is to transform how leaders and companies connect to work that matters. Branching off of that focus are our five core values: Authenticity, Gratitude, Perseverance, Relentless Learner, and Teamwork. Take a look at how our team approaches and embraces each of these Y Scouts values:

Our Office!

We’re right in the heart of sunny Old Town Scottsdale, which draws visitors from all over the world. Earlier in 2016, Y Scouts moved into our new office—”a home that can accommodate our growing team. We also wanted a new home that would foster a walkable environment. With our new office at Y Scouts, we want to encourage our team members to get outside, to be active, and to be able to walk to and from lunch and not have to get into a car every time you need to go somewhere. Old Town Scottsdale afforded us that opportunity,” according to Co-Founder & Managing Partner Brian Mohr. Since he and Max Hansen started Y Scouts in 2012, the team has grown and everyone loves the new digs in Scottsdale! Take a look at some photos of our beautiful office.

Do you have more questions regarding “Why work at Y Scouts?” Let us know!


Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that finds purpose-aligned and performance-proven leaders to help organizations achieve their missions faster. Ready to supercharge your leadership search and get the right person in your organization? Contact Y Scouts.

What To Do Before Making A Major Career Change

What To Do Before Making A Major Career Change

Are you considering making a major career change? If so, there’s some crucial things you’ll need to consider to successfully navigate the transition.

At Y Scouts, we’ve seen everyone from the Former Director of Camp David to current business owners come to us looking to make a dramatic career change. People who want to successfully navigate a major career transition need to spend time defining their “why” – the reason why they work. Without having a clear definition of what motivates you in your work, career changers will inevitably run into the same career dilemmas they face now.

Here are a few tips on what to do before making a major career change that we’ve developed for leaders we work with at Y Scouts:

1. Define your “why” – the reason why you work.
Roy Spence of the Purpose Institute defines Purpose as “a definitive statement about the difference that you are trying to make in the world.” What do you believe your purpose to be?

2. Identify your areas of mastery – the places where you currently or desire to excel in your work.
The book Conscious Capitalism by John Mackey & Raj Sisodia suggests that there are four categories of great purpose. If forced to pick one, which area of mastery best applies to you?

3. Describe the role that would make you excited to jump out of bed each day.
It’s most helpful to answer this question by including specifics about your ideal role functions as well as your preferred organizational traits such as size, industry, and culture.

Once you’ve answered and thought about these three areas, ask yourself, ‘Does the career opportunity in front of me align with my “why”, my areas of mastery, and my excitement?’ If the answer is yes, you’re ready to make a major career leap.

Paul Eisenstein Y ScoutsPaul Eisenstein is the Leadership Search Director at Y Scouts, an executive search firm that helps nonprofits and social enterprises find exceptional leaders. Contact us if you are looking to find an exceptional leader. To be considered for exceptional leadership opportunities with our clients, please take the first step by joining the Y Scouts Leadership Community.

6 Ways To Get The Attention Of A Hiring Manager

How To Get The Attention Of A Hiring ManagerWe’ve asked the Y Scouts Leadership Community a simple question: How would you get the attention of a hiring manager? This post compiles their answer for 6 ways to get the attention of a hiring manager.

Intro to the Hiring Manager
Earn an introduction to the hiring manager by reviewing your connections on Linkedin. If the hiring manager sees that the intro is coming from someone they know, the chance of an interview greatly increases.

Button up your LinkedIn profile
LinkedIn is the new resume for the digital age. Treat your Linkedin profile just like your resume by highlighting your past work experience, education, skills and endorsements.

Treat the mission like a Marketing Campaign
Treat a job search like a marketing campaign. Come up with a strategy and tactics (like the ones discussed in this post) and execute. Without treating a job search like a marketing campaign, you’ll waste time on applications that will miss your target. Just like well executed marketing, the unique always rise above the rest.

Write The Hiring Manager
Hiring managers can tell from a cover letter or email whether they’re interested in learning more about a candidate. Craft a well written cover letter or email that first and foremost addresses WHY you want to work at THEIR company. Cite how your personality and accomplishments would be a great addition to the company culture and objectives. This shows you care about that specific company as opposed to just getting a job.

Show Your Value Online

Find the hiring manager online. If they actively participate in social media, listen to what they’re saying. When you can add value to the conversation, chime in with your two cents.

Be Patiently Persistent
Even hiring managers acknowledge that the squeaky wheel get’s the grease. Whatever tactics you try, if you keep trying to get an interview or to get the attention of the hiring manager – you’ll show persistence, desire, and reveal who you are before the resume is reviewed (if the resume ever is reviewed).

Y Scouts is an executive search firm that helps nonprofits and social enterprises find exceptional leaders. Contact us if you are looking to find an exceptional leader. To be considered for exceptional leadership opportunities with our clients, please take the first step by joining the Y Scouts Leadership Community.

The Science of a Hunch: What Is Your Purpose?

It’s an awe-inspiring phenomenon, and a display of Mother Nature at her finest. Baby sea turtles hatch from their eggs and will instinctually head towards the brightest horizon—the ocean.

It’s a dangerous journey the little critters. If they don’t move fast enough, they might become prey for birds or other creatures. Or, they may simply get baked by the sun and die from dehydration.

Where do these instincts come from? How do they truly know they’re making the right decision? And, what can we, as recruiters, hiring managers, and C-Level Executives, learn from nature? How do we know our own gut instincts are right?

The Y Scouts Experiment

In business, we often head towards the brightest horizon just like a baby sea turtle. When we recruit people for our organizations, we analyze credentials, past experience, achievements, and other data. When we search for our next career move in the corporate space, we analyze company history, opportunity, compensation, job title, and culture. All of these data points seem like the sensible approach to making wise business decisions.

…but what if our hunches, those nagging gut feelings, tell us something different? That’s what happened to my myself and my business partners when we founded Y Scouts—a Purpose-Based Executive Search firm.

We had all spent most of our careers in the recruitment and job placement industry. We all were quite proud of our previous career accomplishments. But, we also had this strange gut feeling that was leading us in a different direction. We had a feeling that there was something missing from the current way companies recruited people. We had a gut feeling that there was something missing from the way executives were searching for new careers. And, because all of us had personally hit points in our own careers that left us asking some big questions like, “What is my purpose?” we wondered if there were a lot more people out there just like us.

“What if we got to know people instead of their resumes?” we asked.

“What if we asked people to tell us what they want to do with their lives, instead of asking them if they meet the criteria for a specific job description?”

“What if we asked companies to tell us their purpose, and the kind of people they’d be interested in hiring instead of asking them which positions they needed to fill?”

“What if we started an Executive Search Firm, without ever posting a job?”

We had a hunch. That’s all we really had. Sure, we had some science from workplace studies that showed how disengaged people were at work. Yes, we had some data that showed nearly half of us, if we could, would start over on a completely new career path. Of course, we all have decades of experience in the industry that we could use as a foundation. But, we didn’t have any hard science that showed “purpose” as the solution.

We did, however, have some big mouths and inquisitive personalities. We began asking executives questions: “What did you want to be when you grew up? Why do you work? What are you truly passionate about? What makes you really care about a company, or a project? What gets you excited?” And, “What were you meant to do?”

The responses we received were so overwhelming and honest that we created an experiment. “What would happen if we created a system (both online and in-person) that asked people and companies to go through a Purpose Discovery Process with us?”

We launched our experiment. We sat back. We watched. And, what we learned from our experiment is profound: Our hunch is our purpose. And, so is yours.

Each and every day, new executives are flooding our Purpose Discovery Process and actually reaching out to us and thanking us for allowing them to share their purpose. Companies are calling us and asking us how they can build better practices and cultures based on purpose.

Call it instinct. Call it a hunch. Call a nagging suspicion that you or your organization is just lacking something. Call it fluffy. Call it touchy-feely. Call it anything you want. We call it Purpose. It’s that thing that winds you up inside. It’s the thing you know you should be doing every day at work. And, it’s that thing, no matter how many times you tell yourself that it’s unrealistic and you should just forget about it, that won’t go away.

What’s your purpose? Here’s a quick exercise that can help lead you to discovery.

Step 1: Grab a sheet of 8.5 by 11 printer paper. There’s no need get complicated. We all have printer paper.

Step 2: In one sentence or phrase, write down the one reason you would work if you were not getting paid. Keep it short. Take your time. Get specific. And, boil it down to something that really relates to you. “To make the world a better place,” is too generic. We all want that. A teacher might say, “To make one a child, each day, realize their dreams are within reach.” A marketing executive say, “To help women feel confident.” And, a CEO might say something that isn’t related to their current position at all, “To inspire youth to lead.”

Step 3: Hold up your sign and get your picture taken. I know this sounds corny. But, the moment you’re ready to have someone else take your picture with your purpose, is the moment that the nagging suspicion becomes something real and something actionable—it’s a filter for every decision you’ll make. Again, I know many of you will skip this step. I would have skipped it. But, then I did it. And, my life has changed since that day.

The science on human instinct isn’t clear-cut. We don’t know where hunches come from. We can’t explain gut feelings. And, we may never be able to understand the depths of why we all instinctually feel a sense of purpose (to live a certain way, do something amazing, or be part of something that inspires us). But, whether or not we have the science to prove purpose exists may not be the most important hurdle we face. The biggest hurdle might just be blindly accepting that we have a purpose—and then learning to trust that it is our brightest horizon. Go towards it.

Y Scouts is an executive search firm that helps nonprofits and social enterprises find exceptional leaders. Contact us if you are looking to find an exceptional leader. To be considered for exceptional leadership opportunities with our clients, please take the first step by joining the Y Scouts Leadership Community.

How to Make Your LinkedIn Profile More Attractive to Recruiters

Wondering how to make your LinkedIn profile more attractive to recruiters? In this article, Y Scouts offers 5 tips to improve your LinkedIn profile.

How To Make Your LinkedIn Profile More Attractive To RecruitersLinkedIn has successfully carved out its niche as a “professional” social network – the networking site is up to over 200 million users and more people are getting recruited for jobs because of their LinkedIn profiles every day. Here are five tips on how to make your Linkedin profile more attractive to recruiters.

1. Keep Your LinkedIn Profile Up to Date.

Your LinkedIn profile is basically a very thorough online resume. Keep it current, because executive recruiters on LinkedIn are always looking for someone to fill open positions. In order to show that you’re qualified for the best leadership positions available to you, make sure you have all of your related experience listed. You wouldn’t show up to an in-person interview with a copy of your resume that you haven’t updated since 2009. Don’t do it online.

2. Fill out all of the information in your LinkedIn Profile – including your picture.

If you equate LinkedIn with your traditional resume, leaving off information is like describing yourself as “detail oriented” and then littering the rest of the resume with typos. The quickest way to make it look like you don’t care about your LinkedIn profile is to leave it unfinished. Large gaps in information show that you didn’t take the time to complete everything you could to show off your skills. Even having the little gray box where a picture should go is a red flag for purpose based employers, as it’s an obvious sign that your profile is incomplete. If you don’t bother to complete your LinkedIn profile, how can an executive recruiter be confident that you’ll finish any work-related projects you start?

3. Make sure your LinkedIn profile picture you use is something you’d want your employees to see – and an actual picture of you.

This should go without saying, but make sure your LinkedIn profile picture is something you’d want a future boss to see you doing. Meaning that your LinkedIn picture should be professional, or, at the very least, not embarrassing or incriminating. It is also safe to assume that you are not a dog, a car, or one of the Windows sample pictures. These options may be a little more pleasing to the eye than a profile without a picture, but they’re still unprofessional because they’re not you. Depending on your industry, it may be worth it to invest in some professional headshots. However, in some situations, using a camera with a timer and taking a picture in a spot with nice lighting should suffice.

4. Add all of your professional skills and get honest endorsements.

One of the cool things about LinkedIn is that you can get other people to endorse you. Your old bosses and other connections can vouch for your ability to perform certain tasks, and there’s no limit to how many people can help you show yourself off. However, that doesn’t mean you need to message people you don’t know and ask them to endorse your ability to use Microsoft Office just to prove to any recruiters looking at your profile that 500 people have confidence in your ability to make a Power Point. These types of connections are shallow because they have no value to you when you have to call on others in the industry for help. Instead, really the time to make connections and use endorsements that matter and will actually help you make headway in your career. Potential employers should applaud this effort.

5. Use your “voice.”

You’ve set up a comprehensive profile, added your skills, and collected personal recommendations. So…now what? You engage. This is the probably the most crucial – and most often ignored – strategy on LinkedIn. Post relevant and professional content on your stream at a moderate level. Meaning: don’t spam, but let your voice be heard. Don’t be afraid to comment – intelligently – on articles you or your connections post.

Remember to keep it professional, but don’t stray too far from your personal voice when it comes to writing. Some light-hearted, inoffensive humor is appropriate in certain situations. If you focus too much on sounding good, you’ll come across as a robot. Employers and recruiters want someone professional, but they don’t want someone boring. Remember, you are using social media marketing to advance yourself. Let yourself climb up the corporate ladder, but don’t lose your personality in the process.

Y Scouts is an executive search firm that helps nonprofits and social enterprises find exceptional leaders. Contact us if you are looking to find an exceptional leader. To be considered for exceptional leadership opportunities with our clients, please take the first step by joining the Y Scouts Leadership Community.

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