Where Did Fortune 500 CEOs Go To College?

Where did Fortune 500 CEOs go to college? Here are the top 38 colleges with the most alumni in Fortune 500 CEO positions.

Where Did Fortune 500 CEOs Go To College Infographic

1. Harvard University – Cambridge, MA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 25
Number of Degrees: 31
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $1,548.3

(Harvard has 4x the number of Fortune 500 CEO’s compared to Yale.) Click to tweet this.

2. Stanford University – Palo Alto, CA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 11
Number of Degrees: 13
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $492.5

University of Pennsylvania – Philadelphia, PA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 8
Number of Degrees: 9
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $405.4

4. Massachusetts Institute of Technology – Cambridge, MA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 7
Number of Degrees: 8
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $428.5

5. Cornell University – Ithaca, NY
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 6
Number of Degrees: 8
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $375.3

6. University of Chicago – Chicago, IL
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 6
Number of Degrees: 7
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $489.9

7. Northwestern University – Evanston, IL
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 6
Number of Degrees: 7
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $323.7

8. Columbia University – New York, NY
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 6
Number of Degrees: 6
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $545.7

9. Yale University – New Haven, CT
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 6
Number of Degrees: 6
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $330.5

10. Southern Methodist University – Dallas, TX
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 4
Number of Degrees: 5
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $575.3

11. University of Southern California – Los Angeles, CA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 4
Number of Degrees: 4
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $704

12. New York University – New York, NY
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 4
Number of Degrees: 4
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $327.1

13. Texas A&M University – College Station, TX
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 3
Number of Degrees: 3
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $237.8

14. Princeton University – Princeton, NJ
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 3
Number of Degrees: 3
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $218.7

15. University of Notre Dame – South Bend, IN
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 3
Number of Degrees: 3
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $177.8

16. San Diego State University – San Diego, CA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 3
Number of Degrees: 3
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $161.6

17. Pennsylvania State University – State College, PA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 3
Number of Degrees: 3
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $160.4

18. Purdue University – West Lafayette, IN
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 3
Number of Degrees: 3
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $135.4

19. University of Michigan – Ann Arbor, MI
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 3
Number of Degrees: 3
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $113.3

20. University of Kansas – Lawrence, KS
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 3
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $231.1

21. Georgetown University – Washington, D.C.
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 3
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $162.2

22. University of Cincinnati – Cincinnati, OH
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 3
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $89.6

23. Babson College – Babson Park, MA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $335

24. Duke University – Durham, NC
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $218.2

25. University of Minnesota – Minneapolis, MN
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $213.7

26. Brown University – Providence, RI
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $207.7

27. University of Pittsburgh – Pittsburgh, PA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $188.3

28. Clark University – Worcester, MA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $174.5

29. University of Oklahoma – Norman, OK
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $173

30. Tufts University – Medford, MA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $147.7

31. University of San Diego – San Diego, CA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $142.2

32. University of Virginia – Charlottesville, VA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $119.1

33. University of North Carolina at Charlotte – Charlotte, NC
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $112.2

34. University of California, Berkeley – Berkeley, CA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $98.3

35. University of Colorado Boulder – Boulder, CO
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $96

36. Wayne State University – Detroit, MI
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $67.4

37. Boston College – Boston, MA
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $66.6

38. University of Houston – Houston, TX
Number of Fortune 500 CEOs: 2
Number of Degrees: 2
Combined Gross Annual Revenue (in billions): $63.4

Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that helps high growth and innovative organizations find exceptional leaders. To be considered for exceptional leadership opportunities with our clients, please join the Y Scouts Leadership Community. If you are a high growth or innovative organization looking for a leader to join your team, please contact Y Scouts.

High Growth Interview Process

When your company is in high-growth mode, hiring the right people is what will determine the future success of your organization. To get hiring right, you need a specialized high growth interview process to ensure your people have the right combination of functional expertise, purpose and behaviors.

High Growth Interview Process

What To Avoid
During high-growth periods, too many hiring managers are put in a position where they are expected to put out fires. You need someone “yesterday” when it comes to hiring, so that recruiter or hiring manager’s success is measured on time to fill.

Wrong approach.

Think about the internal stakeholders each role impacts. Your supervisor, teammates, board members. Think about the external stakeholders each role impacts. Customers, vendors, suppliers. Think about how the role is connected to the purpose of your company, and the difference the role can make at the company.

All roles impact unforeseen areas of organizations – especially leadership roles. They’re too important to not get right the first time. Rather than measure a recruiter’s success on time to fill, why not measure success by time they’ve stayed, and the impact they’ve had on the organization?

The key to an effective high growth interview process is to shift the focus and mindset at the start of the process.

Building A High Growth Interview Process

Candidate Sources
When you’re in high-growth mode, recruiting often involves tapping your networks to find candidates. Eventually, these wells run dry. In order to attract talent, you’ll eventually have to reach out beyond personal networks. Candidate sources that can be utilized include search firms, attending industry events, social media and more outlets that result in a targeted candidate pool.

You may see that “job boards” are absent from our candidate sourcing recommendations. That’s because we believe candidates read job postings and try to mirror themselves to the description of the position. This may get a candidate an interview at your company, and even a job, but rarely will this process put the right person in the right role.

High-Growth Mindset
Successful companies understand the importance of having a recruiting mindset at all times. Every employee in the organization should rally behind and support company growth by being involved in the recruiting process. Equip your employees with the tools and resources they need to be brand ambassadors and recruiters.

Defining The Intangible Elements

As you’re growing top line revenue, maximizing profitability, increasing client retention, developing emerging leaders, and creating game-changing innovations – it’s important to have clarity on your purpose, your culture, your values, and your leadership philosophy. Without clear definitions for each of these areas, it’ll be near impossible to connect with the right leadership talent who authentically aligns to the core intangible elements of your company.

Defining the Role
Hiring the right leader begins with knowing exactly whom you are seeking. Defining the most critical strategic objectives, key responsibilities, and KSA’s that lead to the biggest impact of the role is the first step. Some other questions to consider:

How does this role connect to the purpose of the company?

How does this role connect to the economic engine of the company?

What’s the biggest difference this role can make within the company?

Who are the people or departments this role brings together?

Interviews: Discovering the Truth
Just because someone can do the job doesn’t mean they should. Interviews should seek to yield pure and authentic responses from candidates about what’s most important to them as they consider a career move.

Interviews: Assessing Upgraded Functional Expertise
A high growth interview process should focus on learning about performance milestones, successes, learning moments, pattern recognition, and relevant, upgraded functional expertise. Make sure to conduct an exhaustive reference-checking process for each finalist.

Interviews: Assessing Breakthrough Leadership Traits
There are critical behaviors every leader must demonstrate in today’s ever-changing business landscape. A high growth interview process should determine whether a candidate aggressively pursues professional and personal growth opportunities, and if they actively choose to create the future by challenging the habits, rules and mental frameworks of what’s worked in the past. Does the candidate focus on raising everyone’s game and driving accountability? Do they demonstrate specific, measurable proof points of consistent, needle-moving accomplishments?

Can they make the impossible, possible?

Decision

The final phases of a high growth interview process is to make a decision. Don’t settle.

You’ll want to get the internal stakeholders together to see if they want to work with the candidate. There are a variety of ways to get feedback – either through written evaluations or a group discussion. Any red flags should be discussed and addressed. Once a consensus decision from the interview team is made, then you can proceed with the hire.

Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that helps high growth and innovative organizations find exceptional leaders. To be considered for exceptional leadership opportunities with our clients, please join the Y Scouts Leadership Community. If you are a high growth or innovative organization looking for a leader to join your team, please contact Y Scouts.

How To Strategically Hire Leaders

how to strategically hire leaders

If you’re an HR manager or are involved in recruiting for your organization, how can you get really smart and strategically hire leaders?

To find the solution, let’s start with the problem. Most recruiters or anyone with experience in hiring to knows that the biggest obstacle to overcome in the hiring process is defining exactly who you’re looking for.

This sounds obvious, but think about it. Recruiters sometimes do not know precisely who they’re looking for. If you don’t know who you’re looking for, you’ll try to reach a broad range of people – and waste a lot of your time and resources. You’ll also waste a lot of time talking to the wrong people (and in the process, waste a lot of their time).

To fight the problem, use a scope and not a shot-gun. By narrowly defining who you’re looking for, you’ll take the first step to efficiently spending your time to strategically hire the right leaders.

Now, how do you define who you’re looking for?

1. Define Your Organization
In order to find the best leader for your organization, think about the purpose, values and mission of your organization. What type of person would be inspired to work at your company? Begin your process by discovering what your leadership and non-leadership team thinks about your purpose, your culture, your values, and your leadership philosophies. By getting in the heads of your team, you’ll be able to leverage their knowledge to strategically find a leader that authentically aligns with the core intangibles of your company.

2. Define The Role
To define the role, crystalize the critical strategic objectives, key responsibilities, knowledge, skills and abilities that lead to the biggest impact in the role. Once the role has been defined, complete a behavioral benchmark assessment to ensure the blueprint of the role includes purpose, behavior and skills.

3. Start The Search
At Y Scouts, we deliberately conceal your company identity and the specific role details from candidates. By doing this, we are able to receive pure and authentic responses from candidates about what’s most important to them as they consider a career move. When the ‘right’ answer is unknown, the truth is easily attainable.

4. Assess Expertise
Once you have an authentic candidate in the door who aligns with your purpose and culture, employ an in-depth interviewing process to focus on their expertise. Evaluate performance milestones, successes, learning moments, pattern recognition, and relevant expertise. Perform an exhaustive reference-checking process for each finalist to make sure you have a full perspective on the candidate.

5. Assess Leadership Traits
Leadership is not found in a job title, it lives in an individual’s behaviors. At Y Scouts, we evaluate three critical behaviors that we believe every leader must demonstrate in today’s ever-changing business landscape. We employ an in depth process to evaluate how a leader learns, develops people and drives results. Make sure to not overlook the traits you believe are inherent to leadership – often this last phases is ignored by organizations and they end up hiring a leader who has the expertise, but not the behaviors to do their job well.

By following these five steps, your organization should be able to strategically hire leaders that align with your purpose and culture. If these steps sound tough, it’s because they are. The executive searches we conduct at Y Scouts can take several months as we search for the right person. Be prepared to invest significant time in this process – and enjoy the results of a strategic leader in the end.

If you are looking to strategically hire a leader for your organization, contact Y Scouts. We are an executive search firm that helps nonprofits, social enterprises and high growth organizations find exceptional leaders.

What To Do Before Making A Major Career Change

What To Do Before Making A Major Career Change

Are you considering making a major career change? If so, there’s some crucial things you’ll need to consider to successfully navigate the transition.

At Y Scouts, we’ve seen everyone from the Former Director of Camp David to current business owners come to us looking to make a dramatic career change. People who want to successfully navigate a major career transition need to spend time defining their “why” – the reason why they work. Without having a clear definition of what motivates you in your work, career changers will inevitably run into the same career dilemmas they face now.

Here are a few tips on what to do before making a major career change that we’ve developed for leaders we work with at Y Scouts:

1. Define your “why” – the reason why you work.
Roy Spence of the Purpose Institute defines Purpose as “a definitive statement about the difference that you are trying to make in the world.” What do you believe your purpose to be?

2. Identify your areas of mastery – the places where you currently or desire to excel in your work.
The book Conscious Capitalism by John Mackey & Raj Sisodia suggests that there are four categories of great purpose. If forced to pick one, which area of mastery best applies to you?

3. Describe the role that would make you excited to jump out of bed each day.
It’s most helpful to answer this question by including specifics about your ideal role functions as well as your preferred organizational traits such as size, industry, and culture.

Once you’ve answered and thought about these three areas, ask yourself, ‘Does the career opportunity in front of me align with my “why”, my areas of mastery, and my excitement?’ If the answer is yes, you’re ready to make a major career leap.

Paul Eisenstein Y ScoutsPaul Eisenstein is the Leadership Search Director at Y Scouts, an executive search firm that helps nonprofits, social enterprises and high growth organizations find exceptional leaders. Click here if your organization is seeking a leader, or click here if you are a leader seeking an organization.

How To Contact Passive Candidates

How To Contact Passive CandidatesIt’s been said that the most difficult challenge facing recruiters today isn’t reaching passive candidates – it’s being heard among a sea of recruiters reaching out to those same candidates.

If you’re a recruiter, how do you cut through the noise and reach the candidate you’ve identified as a potentially great fit?

Here are four tips on how to contact passive candidates:

Know who you’re looking for
This sounds obvious, but we recruiters are sometimes of not knowing who, precisely we’re looking for. If you don’t know who you’re looking for you’ll try to reach a broad range of people – and you’ll be wasting their (and your) time. Use a rifle and not a shot-gun approach and you’ll be spending your precious time with the right people.

Make it personal.
If your email is incredibly general and looks like SPAM, only the naive and those with a lot of time will respond to you. Show that you’ve invested a little time in getting to research them before clicking on the “send” button. That personal touch will greatly increase your response rate.

Be humble and be curious
Some recruiters approach prospects with “I have the PERFECT job for you.” How the heck would the recruiter know? Does he know the prospect’s goals and dreams? Instead, recruiters should approach with the prospect with a proper sense of humility and a curiosity to get to know the person.

Follow-up
There’s data out there that shows that almost everybody responds eventually. Follow-up (respectfully) a 2nd and 3rd time if you think your prospect could be a great fit. And don’t be afraid to pick up the phone. In the age of email and digital communications, if a recruiter calls you on the phone, the prospect knows that that the recruiter has a level of seriousness in the opportunity.

Paul Eisenstein Y ScoutsPaul Eisenstein is the Leadership Search Director at Y Scouts, an executive search firm that helps nonprofits, social enterprises and high growth organizations find exceptional leaders. Click here if your organization is seeking a leader, or click here if you are a leader seeking an organization.

Resumes Haven’t Changed In 500 Years. Here’s Proof.

This is the resume Leonardo da Vinci used in 1482 to sell his experience to the Duke of Milan.

DaVinci Resume

You can read the translation of the resume below. After reading the transcript, you’ll see that the resume of a 30-year old Leonardo da Vinci is not much different than what you’d find from a 30 year old today.

Resumes haven’t changed after more than 500 years?

Does a piece of paper really capture the purpose and profound connection a person has to their work?

In da Vinci’s case, and in all of our cases today, the resume continues to miss out on the ‘who I am’ and ‘where I’m going.’

Here’s the resume transcript of one of the greatest artists ever:

Most Illustrious Lord, Having now sufficiently considered the specimens of all those who proclaim themselves skilled contrivers of instruments of war, and that the invention and operation of the said instruments are nothing different from those in common use: I shall endeavor, without prejudice to any one else, to explain myself to your Excellency, showing your Lordship my secret, and then offering them to your best pleasure and approbation to work with effect at opportune moments on all those things which, in part, shall be briefly noted below.

1. I have a sort of extremely light and strong bridges, adapted to be most easily carried, and with them you may pursue, and at any time flee from the enemy; and others, secure and indestructible by fire and battle, easy and convenient to lift and place. Also methods of burning and destroying those of the enemy.

2. I know how, when a place is besieged, to take the water out of the trenches, and make endless variety of bridges, and covered ways and ladders, and other machines pertaining to such expeditions.

3. If, by reason of the height of the banks, or the strength of the place and its position, it is impossible, when besieging a place, to avail oneself of the plan of bombardment, I have methods for destroying every rock or other fortress, even if it were founded on a rock, etc.

4. Again, I have kinds of mortars; most convenient and easy to carry; and with these I can fling small stones almost resembling a storm; and with the smoke of these cause great terror to the enemy, to his great detriment and confusion.

5. And if the fight should be at sea I have kinds of many machines most efficient for offense and defense; and vessels which will resist the attack of the largest guns and powder and fumes.

6. I have means by secret and tortuous mines and ways, made without noise, to reach a designated spot, even if it were needed to pass under a trench or a river.

7. I will make covered chariots, safe and unattackable, which, entering among the enemy with their artillery, there is no body of men so great but they would break them. And behind these, infantry could follow quite unhurt and without any hindrance.

8. In case of need I will make big guns, mortars, and light ordnance of fine and useful forms, out of the common type.

9. Where the operation of bombardment might fail, I would contrive catapults, mangonels, trabocchi, and other machines of marvellous efficacy and not in common use. And in short, according to the variety of cases, I can contrive various and endless means of offense and defense.

10. In times of peace I believe I can give perfect satisfaction and to the equal of any other in architecture and the composition of buildings public and private; and in guiding water from one place to another.

11. I can carry out sculpture in marble, bronze, or clay, and also I can do in painting whatever may be done, as well as any other, be he who he may.

Again, the bronze horse may be taken in hand, which is to be to the immortal glory and eternal honor of the prince your father of happy memory, and of the illustrious house of Sforza.

And if any of the above-named things seem to anyone to be impossible or not feasible, I am most ready to make the experiment in your park, or in whatever place may please your Excellency – to whom I comment myself with the utmost humility, etc.

3 Signs Of A Relentless Next-Level Learner

Relentless LearnerBob at Webucator recently reached out to Y Scouts to ask a simple question.

What do you consider to be the most valuable workplace skill in 2015?

Given that we’ve closely analyzed the skills, talents and attributes of thousands of leaders in the Y Scouts Leadership Community, we have a unique perspective on this question.

Our answer: The most valuable workplace and life skill is to be Relentless Next-Level Learner.

What does it mean to be a Relentless Next-Level Learner? We like to define it as someone who aggressively pursues professional and personal growth opportunities; Actively chooses to create the future by challenging the habits, rules and mental frameworks of what’s worked in the past.

Let’s break down the definition a bit more.

Aggressively pursues professional and personal growth opportunities
Our unique candidate outreach process begins by deliberately concealing the specific details of the open leadership role. This unique approach yields pure and authentic responses from candidates about what’s most important to them as they consider a career move.

When the ‘right’ answer is unknown, the truth is easily attainable.

By concealing the identities of the potential employer and the job, we tend to receive authentic and detailed responses about professional and personal growth experiences.

For example, if you were to write a resume, what would you include in these areas:

  • // Education
  • // Professional Accreditations
  • // Press Links
  • // Volunteer + Board Member Activities

All of these areas are crucial measurements in demonstrating an active pursuit of personal and professional growth. If your list is thin in each of these areas, consider taking steps in finding opportunities to learn and grow.

Actively chooses to create the future
Part of our in-depth interviewing process at Y Scouts focuses on performance milestones, successes and learning moments.

We know that breakthrough leaders create game-changing innovations. They make the ‘impossible’ possible. When we’re interviewing candidates and reviewing their resume, we’re determining whether they’re one of the special ones that shape the world we live in.

For each finalist we submit, we perform an exhaustive reference-checking process.

If Y Scouts were to ask three people you’ve worked with if you’re a leader that thrives on polishing your past, or if you’re a leader who thrives on creating the future – what would they say?

Challenging the habits, rules and mental frameworks of what’s worked in the past
Good leaders have had a lot of success in their careers.

They’ve grown revenue. They’ve maximized profitability. They’ve increased client retention and developed other leaders.

But the great leaders are the ones that don’t rest on what’s worked in the past. They’re constantly challenging their own habits, rules and frameworks for continuous improvement.

If you were to define your habits, rules and frameworks – how would you define them, and how are you challenging them today?

Relentless Next-Level Learner Summary

To sum things up, being a Relentless Next-Level Learner is the one talent or piece of knowledge that could most help you be successful in your job or life.

Start by aggressively pursueing professional and personal growth opportunities. Actively choose to create the future. Challenging your habits, rules and mental frameworks of what’s worked in the past.

Take it to the Next-Level.

Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that helps organizations find Breakthrough Leaders. The Y Scouts approach to Breakthrough Leadership Search is best described as a ‘Covert Search Operation in Pursuit of the Best Possible Outcome’.

If you are in search of a Breakthrough Leader, contact us.

If you are a leader looking for the next step in your career, we invite you to join the Y Scouts Leadership Community.

Infographic: Millennials on Leadership + The Workplace

Deloitte recently surveyed 7,800 millennials across 29 countries.

What did they find?

A few of the things we found to be interesting:

// 60% cited a company’s driving purpose as key factor for taking a job.
// Millennials believe the best leaders have an overarching “sense of purpose”
// If you want to attract millennials to your company, nothing works like a purpose-driven mission statement.

Here is the infographic detailing more of Deloitte’s findings:

Millennial Infographic

10 Attributes of an Exceptional Executive Director

Executive Director

What are the top attributes, characteristics, and traits that make up an exceptional Executive Director?

As a leadership search firm that finds breakthrough Executive Directors for nonprofits, we’ve had unique experiences and perspective on this question. We interview executive directors for breakthrough leadership opportunities every day.

What have we found? And, perhaps more importantly, what do the nonprofit leaders in the Y Scouts Leadership Community say make an Executive Director “exceptional?”

Here’s what our executive nonprofit recruiters and leadership community had to offer about the ten attributes of an exceptional Executive Director.

Authenticity. People respond well to others who don’t try to hide who they are. Executive Directors are no different. You could have lunch with an Executive Director and be at ease. Exceptional Executive Directors encourage their nonprofit staff to be themselves.

Self-awareness. An effective Executive Director is aware of their actions and reflect on decisions without any bias. They invest in themselves and put in a lot of effort to use their strengths to the max.

Relentless Learner. For most Executive Directors, the learning never stops. They attend events, independently go online and research topics, and are driven to understand how things are done.

Focus on long-term results. Executive Directors don’t waste precious time worrying over the temporary setbacks. Their focus is always on the long term, and know that patience yields results in the long run.

Productivity Driver. Executive Directors examine trends and developments among the staff to influence and create an environment that works towards the nonprofit’s mission.

Inspires Others. If an Executive Director can’t inspire others, then volunteer development, fundraising, the Board of Directors, and nonprofit staff won’t be inspired to serve the mission either. Everything starts at the top.

Community Presence. An effective director builds and gains their personal and organizational presence on the local level. They’re the face of the nonprofit, and managing that brand directly lends to the success of the organization.

Relentless Recruiter. Almost half of all time an ED spends is spent recruiting. By recruiting and empowering volunteer leaders, the organizational mission is collectively achieved.

Fundraiser. Some ED’s don’t like to fundraise. The exceptional ones are fantastic fundraisers. They support the fundraising efforts by cultivating and nurturing all relationships – not just the ones that are considered to be “major.”

Leads the vision with purpose. Above all, the executive director is able to communicate a compelling and inspired purpose. When they talk, it’s always about beyond today. They talk about possibilities in an optimistic way with real measureables to ensure the vision is achieved. They lead, inspire and motivate by simply sharing their vision.

Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that finds breakthrough leaders for nonprofits and social enterprises.

Click here if you’re a nonprofit looking to find an executive director. Click here if you’re a nonprofit leader looking for a new professional challenge.

6 Ways To Get The Attention Of A Hiring Manager

How To Get The Attention Of A Hiring ManagerWe’ve asked the Y Scouts Leadership Community a simple question: How would you get the attention of a hiring manager? This post compiles their answer for 6 ways to get the attention of a hiring manager.

Intro to the Hiring Manager
Earn an introduction to the hiring manager by reviewing your connections on Linkedin. If the hiring manager sees that the intro is coming from someone they know, the chance of an interview greatly increases.

Button up your LinkedIn profile
LinkedIn is the new resume for the digital age. Treat your Linkedin profile just like your resume by highlighting your past work experience, education, skills and endorsements.

Treat the mission like a Marketing Campaign
Treat a job search like a marketing campaign. Come up with a strategy and tactics (like the ones discussed in this post) and execute. Without treating a job search like a marketing campaign, you’ll waste time on applications that will miss your target. Just like well executed marketing, the unique always rise above the rest.

Write The Hiring Manager
Hiring managers can tell from a cover letter or email whether they’re interested in learning more about a candidate. Craft a well written cover letter or email that first and foremost addresses WHY you want to work at THEIR company. Cite how your personality and accomplishments would be a great addition to the company culture and objectives. This shows you care about that specific company as opposed to just getting a job.

Show Your Value Online

Find the hiring manager online. If they actively participate in social media, listen to what they’re saying. When you can add value to the conversation, chime in with your two cents.

Be Patiently Persistent
Even hiring managers acknowledge that the squeaky wheel get’s the grease. Whatever tactics you try, if you keep trying to get an interview or to get the attention of the hiring manager – you’ll show persistence, desire, and reveal who you are before the resume is reviewed (if the resume ever is reviewed).

Contact Us

If your organization is looking for a leader to join your team, please reach out to Y Scouts by completing the information below.

If you are a leadership candidate looking for the next step in your career, please join our leadership community.

For non-leadership roles, please visit our sister company, TruPath.