Youth Evaluation and Treatment Centers Testimonial

logoName: Linda Volhein

Role: Interim CEO

Company: Youth Evaluation and Treatment Centers | Valley Clinical Services

Practice Area: Nonprofit & Social Enterprise

“I have had a great experience working with Paul and Y Scouts. Paul has led our agency through the recruitment process for a new CEO with great results. He is knowledgeable, helpful, always available to support us through all of the decision points we encountered. I recommend Paul as someone who will get results, but also someone you will enjoy working with.”

Y Scouts helps nonprofits and social enterprises find exceptional leaders. To be considered for exceptional leadership opportunities with our clients, please take the first step by joining the Y Scouts Leadership Community. If you are looking for an exceptional leader to join your organization, contact us to experience a different approach to recruiting.

Year Up Testimonial

Nonprofit Executive Search Firm Testimonial

year up logoName: Scott Donohue

Role: National Site Director

Company: Year Up

Practice Area: Nonprofit & Social Enterprise

Y Scouts partnered with Year Up to understand our organization and our goals for new leadership. The Y Scouts approach was exceptionally effective, delivering a slate of candidates who embodied the essential values and experience we wanted. Our outcome was a dynamic and experienced leader who truly embodies our mission. As we continue to expand across the country, we consider Y Scouts a go-to partner in future searches.

Y Scouts helps nonprofits and social enterprises find exceptional leaders. To be considered for exceptional leadership opportunities with our clients, please take the first step by joining the Y Scouts Leadership Community. If you are looking for an exceptional leader to join your organization, contact us to experience a different approach to recruiting.

How to Select An Exceptional Leader

How To Select An Exceptional Leader

The right leaders make all the difference.

It’s simple. If you look at all the successful companies in history and today, they’ll have one thing in common: exceptional leadership.

As Y Scouts continues to pioneer a revolutionary approach to identify exceptional leaders and match them to the positions you need, the most common question we frequently field is along the lines of “how to select an exceptional leader.”

We’re passionate about the power of the right connections, and wanted to utilize a community we’ve long been a part of: HARO. We asked the HARO community for their tips and advice for employers who are looking to hire an exceptional leader for their organization. We asked them what should they look for in a leader, and how can they make the right hiring decisions?

Here’s what the HARO community came back with.

Tell me something that’s true
Sean Si, CEO of Qeryz

I’ll definitely go with Peter Thiel’s approach on this one. Ask a potential leader this: “Tell me something that’s true, that almost nobody agrees with you on.”

This does two things: Validate originality of thinking and courage in speaking up – two critical traits for a leader especially in this day and age.

Being a coachable coach
Adam Dailey, Chief Executive Officer at FunLy Events

Employers who want great leaders should look at a leader’s ability to be coached and to coach others. Ask them to point out times where they’ve coached others. Using the word ‘coach’ instead of ‘lead’ gets people to open up more.

Seek complete and consistent information
Tacy M. Byham and Richard S. Wellins are CEO and SVP, respectively, of Development Dimensions International (DDI)

Over the last four decades, we’ve trained thousands of managers to make better hiring decisions. As we worked with our clients, we began to document some of their most common mistakes.

One of the major hiring mistakes is failing to seek complete and consistent information from applicants on the specific competencies needed for success in the job. In fact, if you were to ask a group of managers hiring for the same requirements for success, they’re often likely to come up with different lists.

Focus On Cultural Fit
Dominique Jones, Vice President of Human Resources, of Halogen Software

My best advice is to focus on cultural fit. While a candidate for a leadership position may have the right experience, which is important of course, it’s important to ensure this individual’s competencies align to your core values. This means looking beyond technical competencies when assessing candidates for their role. Look at behavioral competencies, as well. Individuals who are a good fit are likely to be more engaged and happier in their role.

Focus On The Exceptional Things
Dr. Chester Goad, of The EdVenturist

Sometimes we tend to over complicate the search for exceptional leaders. It’s actually pretty simple. We can identify exceptional leaders by the exceptional things they have done. For example, accomplishments or successful undertakings outside the typical scope of their job. What are candidates accomplishments that are above, beyond or even outside the job that strike you as exceptional? Look for those things that are uncommon, unusual, remarkable, or outstanding about them. It’s certainly possible to be top notch, an excellent worker, a mover and a shaker, without being truly exceptional. When it comes to leadership, we have to get beyond thinking just in terms of a dedicated or hardworking, employee. We all want dedicated and hardworking team members. An exceptional leader though, will be doing extraordinary things. They will stand out and because of their ability to stand out, or to do uncommon things even among a field of dedicated, hard working people.

The ability to keep a clear focus
William Bauer, Managing Director of Royce Leather

We promote those with the ability to manage and lead in times of ambiguity, conflict, uncertainty and inconsistency. Life is not a straight line. What differentiates leaders from the average soul is the ability to keep a clear focus on the end goal despite all the setbacks and lack of perfect information.

Ask About Past Failures
Idan Shpizear, CEO of 911 Restoration

Leaders are positive. Leaders believe in possibility. From my experience, every project will experience momentary setbacks. It then becomes the leader’s job to raise morale and get things going. When I interview candidates I ask them about their past failures. I don’t care so much that they failed, but I do care about their attitude and perspective on their past failures. If they dwell on it or apologize for it, I know they’re not for me.

Leadership Is About Listening
Deborah Sweeney, CEO of MyCorporation.com

Leadership roles come with a lot of baggage. Assumptions abound about what a leader is supposed to be and do, so if you hire someone with no leadership experience, chances are they still believe old tropes about strength and decisiveness, when in reality leading, especially in the context of a business, is more about listening and running a team from within. Effective leaders see themselves as a part of a team, and most people don’t realize that until they’ve been given a leadership role. When hiring, look for people who have some sort of leadership experience – even if it’s just for a few projects, or within a different industry, or as a volunteer. Leadership is hard to teach, but a little experience goes a long way.

Failing that, give them a scenario wherein they have to demonstrate their traits and decision-making as a leader. See if they talk about listening to their team, or if they just give a laundry list of actions they’d take. At the end of the day they are the ones making the decisions, but you don’t want to hire anyone who sees themselves as the keystone of a team.

Look At The Track Record
Keith Johnston, True North Leadership

One of the best ways to find exceptional leaders is to look at their track record. Their track record should include high school and college
experiences. Were they selected as captain of their football team or president of their fraternity. Were there examples of peers in their organizations selecting them as their leaders? Ask them about projects they have been involved in and how they were able to get their project team to buy in to the vision. Find out how they went about communicating their vision, particularly how they were able to make it a shared vision. When they talk about their accomplishments do they give credit to their team and supporting cast or do they take all the credit for themselves?

Know the Difference Between Leading and Managing
Milan Dekich, Marketing Manager & Start Up Advisor, Genesis Net Development

Managers keep the status quo. Leaders have a vision for the future. What does the potential leader see for your company? What are their dreams and envisions? If they can’t sell you (the employer) on where they plan to take the organization, how can sell their staff?

Come up with questions that will help you decipher their ability to know when it’s time to manage and when it’s time to motivate their staff to new frontiers.

Passionate, Decisiveness, Toughness
Crystal Stranger, EA, President of 1st Tax

There are three things that businesses should look for in hiring an exceptional leader:

1. Passionate – having someone who genuinely loves what you do is critical as this person must be the one driving the motivation for everyone else on the team.

2. Decisive – ask them questions about how they have made big decisions in the past, and test them with little decisions to see how they react.

3. Tough – a good leader shouldn’t come over too easily. They should negotiate hard with you to get the most for themselves, this shows they have a better chance of negotiating on behalf of the company.

How To Hire A VP of Operations

how to hire a vp of operations

Day-to-day execution and administration of a business are the foundation that helps build exceptional organizations, and the person in charge of these two critical areas is a VP of Operations.

If you’ve already crossed the bridge of when to hire a VP of Operations and what to look for in a VP of Operations, then the next step in the leadership search process is deciding how to hire a VP of Operations.

There are many ways a senior leadership team can go about finding and interviewing a candidate who excels in certain workplace environments. Here are four tips to use when deciding how to hire a VP of Operations for your organization.

1. Use an executive search firm

Many senior leadership teams excel in specific areas – sales, engineering, finance – but often times operations is not one of those areas of expertise. If hiring a VP of Operations seems overwhelming, consider hiring an executive search firm that specializes in high growth leadership positions. Since recruiters at an executive search firm already have a defined hiring process, they can organize and execute your search while your leadership team can focus on improving and expanding your business.

The staff at a leadership search firm has experience finding, interviewing, and hiring a Vice President of Operations. An executive search firm may know some potential candidates for the position right off the bat, and can certainly vet out the candidates that aren’t a good fit. The expertise offered at an executive search firm can be an objective and effective way to find the right person to head up your operations.

2. The Network Of Your Leadership Team

Your senior leadership team has professional connections that may be a good fit for your VP of Ops role. Talk to them. Mention your organization is searching for someone to manage the day to day operations of your organization. Not only may someone in your network be the perfect candidate, but they also may know someone who is interested and can establish make a valuable introduction. This introduction is crucial because the candidate gets a personal endorsement from someone you trust, and your company gets an endorsement from someone the candidate trusts. If in-person networking doesn’t lead to any results, try using social networks such as LinkedIn to find senior vice presidents.

3. Don’t do it alone

Hiring a VP of Operations is a major decision, and there is a lot of pressure on the future of your organization and customers to select the right candidate. If you’re the person responsible for making this decision, the pressure intensifies. In order to make hiring a VP of Ops a little less intimidating, involve other leaders in your company and the people who will be directly impacted by the hire.

Other executives, mentors, and trusted colleagues can all be a big help when you’re learning how to hire a VP of Operations. If your company currently employs customer service representatives, make sure they play a major role in deciding who will be their future boss. Other employees have unique insights on the role, which helps refine the search process and attract the best candidates, and their perspective can help you get a well-rounded view of the situation.

4. Plan Ahead

If executed improperly, an addition to your senior leadership team and organizational processes can be jarring. Make a plan for your company in order to help your new VP of Operations adjust to the position. Work with your current customer service team to decide what course of action will be best for your company. For example: should your new VP of Operations jump into the position right away with their own processes? Or should a vice president of operations step into an existing organizational process and focus more on the execution? Granted it’s hard to plan ahead when there is a lack of expertise in the room, but by having a plan before hiring a VP of Operations, you can refine your search process and give the candidate an idea of what to expect if they were to be hired.

You might be interested in these other posts about hiring a VP of Operations:
When to Hire a VP of Operations
What to Look For in a VP of Operations
10 VP of Operations Interview Questions
What to Pay your VP of Operations
How To Hire a VP of Operations

What questions do you have about how to hire a VP of Operations? Let us know in the comments.

Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that connects high growth and innovative organizations with exceptional leaders. We do things differently because we understand the value created through the right connections. Take the first step to joining our community here. Contact us to learn more about how Y Scouts can help you hire a VP of Sales.

When To Hire A VP of Operations

when to hire a vp of operations

The job of a VP of Operations is to handle the day-to-day execution and administration of a business.

The primary purpose of hiring a VP of Operations is to help everyone in the organization maximize their time and efficiency – especially the executive leadership team.

So when should you hire a VP of Operations? Here are four signs that your business is in need of a operations leader.

1. The CEO spends more than 20% of their time managing the day-to-day

Businesses take time to grow, and they take a heck of a lot of time to manage. If the CEO is spending their time managing the day-to-day execution of their business, their peak energy and time is being spent in the wrong place. The CEO is the forefront of the company – not the backend. They are responsible for setting the vision and running the product direction. It’s the polar opposite of what operations leaders focus on. If a CEO can do the math and figure that they are devoting too much time to operations, it may be time to hire a VP of Operations.

2. Recurring revenue is growing

Some organizations look to a VP of Operations to save the day when revenue starts to drop. That’s the opposite of when to hire a VP of Operations. Instead, when there are signs that recurring revenue is growing – that’s the time to bring in an operations leader. That’s when a Vice President of Operations can improve the customer experience and execution of strategy to make sure things continue to skyrocket with a hockey stick growth curve.

3. Your customer service team is getting bogged down

Your customer service team of 2 to 4 people are successful in keeping customers happy with service methods – but they are getting bogged down as the client base grows and their team size stays the same. They’re no longer experimenting with the best way to service a customer. Instead, they’ve developed a method that works and now they just need a leader to help formalize and grow the process in a big way.

That’s when to hire a VP of Operations.

4. When you know who you are, and what works

During the exploratory startup phase, your organization is often redefining themselves and the product. That’s not the time to bring in a VP of Operations. When your organization knows what it stands for and realizes that the foundation won’t support organizational growth – that’s the time to begin your search for someone to lead your operations efforts to help stabilize your processes, policies and procedures.

You might be interested in these other posts about hiring a VP of Operations:
When to Hire a VP of Operations
What to Look For in a VP of Operations
10 VP of Operations Interview Questions
What to Pay your VP of Operations
How To Hire a VP of Operations
What questions do you have about when to hire a VP of Operations? Let us know in the comments.

Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that connects high growth and innovative organizations with exceptional leaders. We do things differently because we understand the value created through the right connections. Take the first step to joining our community here. Contact us to learn more about how Y Scouts can help you hire a VP of Sales.

What To Look for In A VP Of Operations

what to look for in a vp of operations

You’ve decided you need to make a crucial leadership hire, and now it’s time to start identifying what to look for in a VP of Operations. But if you’ve never been in an operations role, how do you know which qualities make a VP of Ops successful?

As a leadership search firm that connects high growth organizations with exceptional leaders, Y Scouts understands the importance of connecting companies with candidates based on research, outreach and through a final interview selection. If you’re unsure about what to look for in a VP of Operations, here are five qualities you can consider in each phase throughout the hiring process.

1. Culture Fit
Culture fit is one of the most important attributes to look for in a VP of Operations. A VP of Ops who fits in with your company will have an easier time adjusting to the position and the procedures within the company, and will have an easier time forming relationships with your current employees. Since your operations is the pulse within your company, it’s important to hire a leader who aligns with your company’s values.

To hire for cultural fit, start off the Research & Planning phase of your recruitment process by conducting an organization survey among your senior leadership team to help define your culture. By having this definition accessible to everyone involved in the hiring process, you’ll be able to benchmark a candidate’s purpose and values against your organizational culture – a critical first step to attracting the right leadership candidates.

2. Industry Understanding
This goes without saying, but if a VP of Operations doesn’t understand how to operate within your industry, then chances are that they may not be a good fit. Experience, and industry understanding are high up the totem pole of importance in a senior leadership role. If the candidate can talk about how the industry is evolving, they should have a general idea of what your company needs to do in order to stay on top of the changes. All of this knowledge is extremely important to look for in a VP of Operations, because it shows that the candidate is thinking about how to adjust an organization in the face of new changes.

During the Outreach & Aligning process, evaluating functional expertise is a necessary step right after Purpose & Values.

3. Drives Results
As the leader of your operations, a good VP of Ops lives by the results – how efficient the organization is run, what’s the profit margin, how is the company doing as a while? When reaching out to candidates, part of the evaluation process must measure how they’ve driven results for their previous employers, and how they can drive results for your organization.

4. Develops Process
If an operations employee is only as good as the organization’s process, then a VP of Operations better be able to develop a great process. Good senior level operations executives understand that if they are going to achieve lofty revenue targets, then they’ll have to accomplish them by innovating a process. During the Outreach & Aligning process, evaluate how a candidate speaks about their biggest accomplishments. Do they start and end with their own accomplishments, or do they mention that developing a process as one of their career accomplishments? Look for specific examples of how a candidate has made it a point to develop their operations philosophies, and ask how they would develop the operations at your organization.

5. Learns Relentlessly
When deciding what to look for in a VP of Operations, consider if a candidate is a relentless learner. Are they constantly looking for an edge in your industry, or do they rely on a proven operations model that’s worked at their previous companies? Do they know the industry a little too well, and feel like they know everything? Or do they use their industry knowledge to learn more about how they can capitalize on opportunities? Great operations leaders never stop learning. They develop themselves, then develop their process, which in turn drives results.

Once your candidates pass the Purpose & Values test, show that they have Functional Expertise, Drive Results, Develops People and Learns Relentlessly, then it’s time to select your interview finalists and make your selections.

You might be interested in these other posts about hiring a VP of Operations:
When to Hire a VP of Operations
What to Look For in a VP of Operations
10 VP of Operations Interview Questions
What to Pay your VP of Operations
How To Hire a VP of Operations
How did you decide what to look for in a VP of Operations? Let us know in the comments.

Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that connects high growth and innovative organizations with exceptional leaders. We do things differently because we understand the value created through the right connections. Take the first step to joining our community here. Contact us to learn more about how Y Scouts can help you hire a VP of Sales.

What To Pay a VP of Operations

what to pay a vp of operations

After deciding when to hire a VP of Operations, what to look for in a VP of Operations, and how to hire a VP of Operations, you’ve likely been able to find a few potential candidates. Once you’ve asked some great interview questions, it’s time to start thinking about what to pay a VP of Operations.

It can be difficult to determine what to pay a VP of Operations, and since you’re negotiating salary with a professional that is very good with operating numbers – it can be difficult to find a salary number that’s fair for both sides. Here are four factors your company needs to consider when negotiating salary with an operations leader.

1. Your company’s size
Studies have shown that smaller companies tend to pay a VP of Operations less than larger companies. Your company’s size and the workload your operations leader will be responsible for managing should significantly impact the salary level and benefits offered.

2. Education
Education is important at the leadership level. A VP of Operations with an advanced degree has a large amount of specialized operating knowledge that will benefit you and your company. The more specialized knowledge a candidate has, the more they can contribute as a member of your senior leadership team.

3. Experience
While formal education is an important consideration when it comes to determining salary, work experience is also important to evaluate what to pay a candidate. A candidate’s work experience shows you what they are capable of accomplishing as an employee. The most valuable employees are the ones who show a history of success within their career and demonstrate a deep dedication to relentless learning.

Experience in fields outside of operations can be relevant too. If a candidate has industry experience outside of operations, this added bonus can enable the candidate to better understand different departments and could be enough to warrant a pay raise. Compare your candidate’s skill set with what you look for in a VP of Operations and decide how much you are willing to compensate them for their expertise.

4. Bonuses, stock options, and other benefits
Executives such as the Vice President of Operations often receive bonuses, stock options, or even equity for the overall organizational performance. If you are offering similar benefits, remember to factor in their value when you’re deciding what to pay a VP of Operations. How much do their decisions and actions directly impact organizational performance? In addition, be sure to mention these benefits early in the salary negotiation process. If you’re going to offer bonuses, make sure they are directly tied to the results they’re driving for your business.

You might be interested in these other posts about hiring a VP of Operations:
When to Hire a VP of Operations
What to Look For in a VP of Operations
10 VP of Operations Interview Questions
What to Pay your VP of Operations
How To Hire a VP of Operations
What questions do you have about what to pay a VP of Operations? Let us know in the comments.

Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that connects high growth and innovative organizations with exceptional leaders. We do things differently because we understand the value created through the right connections. Take the first step to joining our community here. Contact us to learn more about how Y Scouts can help you hire a VP of Sales.

10 VP Of Operations Interview Questions

VP of Operations Interview Questions

As a leadership search firm, Y Scouts often interviews people for VP of Operations roles. We examine a number of things throughout our evaluations, with special emphasis on Purpose, Values, Functional Expertise, Results, Personnel Development and Learning. Learn more about our process here.

What VP of Operations interview questions do we ask, and what do other entrepreneurs ask their candidates? We decided to ask our Leadership Community what their favorite question to ask a potential new hire looking for a VP of Operations role, and why? Here’s the summary.

What is the one thing you would change about the company if you could today?
I love to ask this question to find out how much they’ve thought about my business. The answer isn’t super important. What is important is that it is thoughtful.

Tell me about your communication skills.
I generally like to question their communication skills. If someone’s going to lead the operations of my organization, they have to know how to effectively communicate with the leadership team, customers, and direct reports. Exceptional communication skills are a must for any VP of Operations.

What has motivated you in your career?
This interview question helps identify the journey and their sense of purpose. Most interview candidates who are trying to blow smoke will be more than happy to give you a syllabus of their resume. But the rare and special candidates are usually the ones that answer with something simple and impactful like, “Let me tell you why…”

How would you reorganize and restructure an organization that the company wanted to take in a completely new direction?
If they can’t answer, they may not be the right choice.

Tell me about the teams you’ve directly managed, and how you built them.
If they can’t describe how they’ve built and managed a team, chances are they probably can’t build and manage your operations.

What will my revenues look like 120 days after I hire you?
See if they can explain what will happen, but more importantly, how it will happen. There are many wrong answers to this question, but never a correct one.

What are ten things you can do with duct tape?
Great sales people get creative and see multiple uses for your product depending on the customer. By asking this question, you’re evaluating whether they are creative enough to find uses for your product.

What is your greatest flaw in your leadership style?
If they can’t be honest about themselves, how can you expect them to be honest about your company?

We’re on track to miss our target this quarter, you’re the VP of Ops and have 30 days, what are you going to do?
Evaluate how they operate.

Can you please tell me in your own words what we do?
This question quickly separates individuals who are committed and passionate to our vision from those who are simply looking for a job. We find that our best hires have thoroughly researched us, determined the general and specific impact(s) they could have on the organization, and expressed this to us confidently in their first interview.

What VP of Operations interview questions have you been asked? Let us know on Twitter, Facebook or Linkedin. To learn more about the beliefs we have Y Scouts, click here.

You might be interested in these other posts about hiring a VP of Operations:
When to Hire a VP of Operations
What to Look For in a VP of Operations
10 VP of Operations Interview Questions
What to Pay your VP of Operations
How To Hire a VP of Operations

Y Scouts is a leadership search firm that connects high growth and innovative organizations with exceptional leaders. We do things differently because we understand the value created through the right connections. Take the first step to joining our community here. Contact us to learn more about how Y Scouts can help you hire a VP of Sales.

Leadership Traits Learned From Bad Bosses

Leadership Traits learned from bad bosses

Most people have gone through the experience of having a bad boss or working in a negative workplace. Perhaps you find yourself in that predicament right now and are looking for things to learn from your situation.

We’ve asked members of our Leadership Community what leadership traits they have learned from being in a bad workplace or working under a bad boss. Here is what they had to say:

Time Management


The boss of my job spent too much time networking and vetting out potential partners, and nothing ever got done. The leadership trait that I learned from having a boss that wasted billable time was to be reflective. When you’re a boss, not too many people will call you out on time management because they assume a boss knows what they’re doing. Good leaders have to be self aware of how they spend their time, reflective, and measure the results of their time management.

Singing a different tune behind closed doors

The boss I previously worked for had a tendency to praise employees in public, but criticize them in private. This created a lot of tension in the workplace. Trust was absent because we couldn’t take the leadership team for their word. As a result, I’ve always tried to do the opposite – praise in public or private when it’s deserved, and criticize in private with the individual.

Stifling Growth


A previous boss of mine hoarded major tasks and had a tendency to not delegate when delegation was needed. As a result, our organization and team members couldn’t grow with experience within such a controlled environment. Great leaders know when to delegate, step aside, and trust their people to do the job they were hired to do.

Make Employees Fearful of Being Fired


Many years ago I worked under a leader who constantly threatened (and occasionally did) fire people on a whim. Employees were always on edge at the workplace, and their productivity (mine included!) was negatively affected because the fear of losing your job always hung over our heads. Before long, employees started to leave because they couldn’t take it anymore. As I lead my organization today, I make sure to measure the pressure employees feel in their jobs by taking the time to talk with them and learn more about their performance. As a result of the candidness, clarity on both sides is able to exist.

Make Timely Decisions


I once worked for two gentlemen who find it very difficult to make decisions in enough time to act. I watched them drop the ball numerous times because they were too hesitant to act or because they diverged on an issue. Instead I make decisions quickly and I empower my team to make decisions. We’ve built a culture of failing fast, so if we’re wrong we know right away and pivot accordingly.
Michael King


Lack of Communication

Great leaders make a conscious decision to overcommunicate
 until their message is understood and acted upon. Bad bosses fail to understand that often times they have to communicate multiple times in several different ways before employee really comprehend and act on the message. Singular communication may work for some employees, but not all employees learn in this method. If messages are not understood, great leaders ask themselves about the best way to properly convey their message to get the best results.

Clip The Wings

The best leaders allow employees to spread their wings. They never clip them. There are several leaders today that are either physically or figuratively watching an employee’s every move. With that kind of leadership style, people can never fully spread their wings and fly. Leaders today understand that it’s okay to let situational failure occur on their watch. When employees fail, leaders will get together with the employee and help them understand where to correct their mistake moving forward.

Culture starts and stops at the top

An organizational culture – especially in founder and family led businesses – is often an extension of a leader’s personality. Employees follow leaders and mimic their behaviors. Ask yourself: are employees more influenced by a mission statement printed on a wall, or by the person directly managing them? A great leadership trait today is clearly defining the culture and ensuring that your actions are an extension of the culture.

Don’t just “see what happens”

“Seeing what happens” succeeds every time at just that – seeing what happens. A leadership trait leaders need to fall into are setting clear goals that aren’t ambiguous and murky. It’s impossible to be productive when measurements don’t exist. Ask employees to set goals and targets for themselves, and then sign off on them.

Understand that you’re not the smartest person in the room

If you’ve done a good job as a leader, one of your proudest accomplishments should be standing in a room with your team and acknowledging that you’re not the smartest person in the room. The leadership trait bad bosses ignore is surrounding themselves with inferior people, or convincing themselves that they know it all. No. Stop it. Learn from all your employees, and recognize that other employee’s talents will also help you grow as a leader, and will grow the business.

What leadership traits have you learned from bad bosses? Let us know on Twitter, Facebook or Linkedin. To learn more about the beliefs we have Y Scouts, click here.

Y Scouts helps innovative and high growth companies find exceptional leaders. To be considered for exceptional leadership opportunities with our clients, please take the first step by joining the Y Scouts Leadership Community. If you are looking for an exceptional leader to join your organization, contact us to experience a different approach to recruiting.

SemiBig Creative Manifesto

SemiBig Creative Industries specializes in User Interface and Experience Design for interactive media. They build application interfaces, websites, and branding strategies that support and extend each client’s business strategy and goals.

SemiBig Creative has developed a manifesto that gives readers an idea of the personality of the company – along with a few of their beliefs.

Our favorite line from the SemiBig Creative Manifesto:

No Erasers Allowed – We post this on the door of every SemiBig Brainstorming Session

Semi Big Creative Manifesto

What’s your company manifesto? Let us know on Twitter, Facebook or Linkedin. To learn more about the beliefs we have Y Scouts, click here.

Y Scouts helps innovative and high growth companies find exceptional leaders. To be considered for exceptional leadership opportunities with our clients, please take the first step by joining the Y Scouts Leadership Community. If you are looking for an exceptional leader to join your organization, contact us to experience a different approach to recruiting.

Find An Exceptional Leader

Looking to hire an exceptional leader? Searching for the ideal candidate? Contact our team.

Are you a leadership candidate seeking the next step in your career? Join our leadership community.

Candidates pursuing non-leadership roles are encouraged to visit our sister company TruPath.